The Pastor

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People are always throwing around the word community  and what it means…I think community is always running into the same people and developing relationships because of that.

I often would see this gentlemen in my going and coming and he’ll say the same thing:

God Bless you sister!

Hey! You looking good today!

God is good!

This Sunday night we both were on our way home and I asked him to pose for a photo. It was only then that he shared with me that he was a minister. Of course he wanted to pose with his sword of the Spirit, which is the word of God.

Roy DeCarava

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Sherry Turner DeCarava

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Book Signing

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Book Signing

 

Did you ever meet someone you clicked with right before moving on to another dimension in life?

This is what happened to me before I graduated Fordham. I met wonderful artist and professors at the other campus- Lincoln Center. I met my mentor, who still mentors me and Joe who never fails to invite me to the dark room…I miss those days.

I also met a lot of my ancestors and professional artist through them.

Somehow, I’ve stayed in contact with them and them with me. So, when shows or opportunities arrises, we are in the loop.

Back in October of last year, Casey texted me to check out Roy DeCarava at Zwirner and I told her I’ll go. I did finally go. It was the last day and it was packed. I ran into Terrance and  met some of his buddies. I was told Mrs. DeCarava was there- which it was a honor to meet her and while standing in line, I was excited to see my Professor, Joe.

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At the Zwirner viewing Roy DeCarava, ran into Joe! 

Somehow I learned about photographer, Roy DeCarava, a month before he died. It was really awkward. I was in the computer lab looking for someone to write about and his story stood out to me. I remember typing his name into google to see if he was still alive and he had just died a month before, that October. Well, he’s another legend I can’t meet I remember thinking. Just like Gordon Parks.

He was born in 1919, in New York where he lived and started his career.  He came from a single parent home. His mother had migrated from Jamaica and placed her son into the programs in the neighborhood. He was a first black in some areas, like the first to integrate the New York City Textile High School and the first to win the Guggenheim Fellowship.

Gordon Parks was and still is my favorite photographer but what I enjoyed when reading  about DeCarava was how real and close to home his struggle was. Firstly, he grew up in New York and experienced segregation. New York isn’t in the south! However, he was the first to integrate his high school! His story speaks to the real New York and how it is- even now!

Secondly, in the late 1940’s, his subject was Harlem. And, he showed Harlem as he saw it. His work is raw and gritty. As he said, ‘[I aimed for] a creative expression, the kind of penetration insight and understanding of Negroes which I believe only a Negro photographer can interpret.” Looking at his images, you are drawn into a world of segregated Harlem, where only Blacks dwelt. A Harlem where children are happy despite poverty and adults are struggling to create a better life.

His photo titled ‘Graduation’ shows a young girl in a white dress surrounded by rubbish. It shows the fluidness of the life his subjects were living; the ability to switch into wanting to live the American dream and at the same time seeing the reality of living as a black person in America.

Needless to say, I was very grateful that day to run into his wife, Sherry Turner DeCarava. I may not have met Roy DeCarava but it was a blessing to meet someone who worked along side of him. And it just so happens that not only did I meet his wife but I learned that my professor, Joe, also worked with Mr. DeCarava.

My trip to Salvador, Bahia

During the summer of 2019 I visited the country of Brazil. I stayed in Salvador, Bahia at a small hotel across from the fisherman’s beach.  Every night the sounds of the water rocked me to sleep and in the morning was there to greet me.

It’s A beach town someone told me.

Oh, that’s the place in Brazil many Blacks live, another person said.

Descendants of slaves, some like to say.

My first day there Kayanara met me at Guarulhos airport. We took a taxi to Bahia. After I freshened up, Kayanara took me to Teatro Miguel Santana.

She showed me the stone church built in the 17th Century for and by the Blacks. In the same area is where Michael Jackson performed “All  I wanna say is they don’t really care about us” which is now a tourist attraction. That’s where I spent my money on a tee for Daniel and Ashley.